source: docs/HPCA2012/latex/egpaper_for_review.tex @ 1328

Last change on this file since 1328 was 1326, checked in by ashriram, 8 years ago

New Intro New title

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1%&latex
2\documentclass[12pt,letterpaper]{article}
3\usepackage{setspace}
4\doublespacing
5\usepackage{iccv}
6\usepackage{times}
7\usepackage{epsfig}
8\usepackage{graphicx}
9\usepackage{amsmath}
10\usepackage{amssymb}
11
12% Include other packages here, before hyperref.
13
14% If you comment hyperref and then uncomment it, you should delete
15% egpaper.aux before re-running latex.  (Or just hit 'q' on the first latex
16% run, let it finish, and you should be clear).
17\usepackage[pagebackref=true,breaklinks=true,letterpaper=true,colorlinks,bookmarks=false]{hyperref}
18
19
20% \iccvfinalcopy % *** Uncomment this line for the final submission
21
22\def\iccvPaperID{****} % *** Enter the HPCA Paper ID here
23\def\httilde{\mbox{\tt\raisebox{-.5ex}{\symbol{126}}}}
24
25% Pages are numbered in submission mode, and unnumbered in camera-ready
26\ificcvfinal\pagestyle{empty}\fi
27\begin{document}
28
29%%%%%%%%% TITLE
30\title{\LaTeX\ Author Guidelines for HPCA Submissions}
31
32\author{First Author\\
33Institution1\\
34Institution1 address\\
35{\tt\small firstauthor@i1.org}
36% For a paper whose authors are all at the same institution,
37% omit the following lines up until the closing ``}''.
38% Additional authors and addresses can be added with ``\and'',
39% just like the second author.
40% To save space, use either the email address or home page, not both
41\and
42Second Author\\
43Institution2\\
44First line of institution2 address\\
45{\small\url{http://www.author.org/~second}}
46}
47
48\maketitle
49% \thispagestyle{empty}
50
51%%%%%%%%% ABSTRACT
52\begin{abstract}
53   The ABSTRACT is to be in fully-justified italicized text. Use the word ``Abstract'' as the title, in 14-point
54   Times, boldface type, centered relative to the column, initially
55   capitalized. The abstract is to be in 12-point, single-spaced type.
56   Leave two blank lines after the Abstract, then begin the main text.
57   Look at previous HPCA abstracts to get a feel for style and length.
58\end{abstract}
59
60%%%%%%%%% BODY TEXT
61\section{Introduction}
62
63Please follow the steps outlined below when submitting your manuscript to
64HPCA\ for review.  \textit{This guide and style files are adapted with some revisions from the guide for ICCV\
65(International Conference on Computer Vision) submissions (http://www.iccv2011.org/paper-submission) and from the guide for MICRO 2011.
66} 
67
68%-------------------------------------------------------------------------
69\subsection{Language}
70
71All manuscripts must be in English.
72
73\subsection{Dual submission}
74
75By submitting a manuscript to HPCA, the authors assert that it has not been previously published in substantially similar
76form.  Furthermore, no paper which contains significant overlap with the contributions of this paper either has been or will
77be submitted during the HPCA 2012 review period to \textbf{either} \textbf{a conference} (including HPCA 2012) or\textbf{
78a journal }(prior publication to IEEE Computer Architecture Letters is not considered a conflict).  Papers violating this
79condition will be rejected and further action will be taken with IEEE and ACM.
80
81If you have submitted any papers recently that may appear to the reviewers to violate this condition, then it is your
82responsibility to (1) cite these papers (preserving anonymity as described in Section 1.6 below), (2) argue in the body of
83your paper why your HPCA paper is nontrivially different from these concurrent submissions, and (3) include anonymized
84versions of those papers as supplemental material (provided that this functionality is present in the submission system at the time of submission --– if not, you do not have to submit this material).
85
86\subsection{Paper Length}
87\textbf{Submitted papers may have up to 28 pages.}.  Overlength papers will simply not be reviewed. This includes papers
88where the margins and formatting are deemed to have been significantly altered from those laid down by this style guide. Note that this \LaTeX\ guide already sets figure captions and references in a smaller font. There are two reasons why such papers will not be reviewed: (1)  There is no provision for supervised revisions of manuscripts. The reviewing process cannot determine the suitability of the paper for presentation in fewer pages than the submitted version. (2) Reviewing is hard work and is done on a volunteer basis on the ``spare'' time of the reviewers. Respect the reviewer'’s time by succinctly presenting your ideas and results in the reasonable amount of space that has been provisioned.
89
90%-------------------------------------------------------------------------
91\subsection{The Ruler}
92The \LaTeX\ style defines a printed ruler which should be present in the
93version submitted for review.  The ruler is provided in order that
94reviewers may comment on particular lines in the paper without
95circumlocution.  If you are preparing a document using a non-\LaTeX\
96document preparation system, please arrange for an equivalent ruler to
97appear on the final output pages.   {\bf Note to Reviewers:}
98note that the ruler measurements do not align well with lines in the paper
99--- this turns out to be very difficult to do well when the paper contains
100many figures and equations, and, when done, looks ugly.  The ruler uses single spacing making it easier to identify lines even under these situations.
101
102\subsection{Mathematics}
103
104Please number all of your sections and displayed equations.  It is
105important for readers to be able to refer to any particular equation.  Just
106because you didn't refer to it in the text doesn't mean some future reader
107might not need to refer to it.  It is cumbersome to have to use
108circumlocutions like ``the equation second from the top of page 3 column
1091''.  (Note that the ruler will not be present in the final copy, so is not
110an alternative to equation numbers).   
111
112
113\subsection{Blind review}
114
115 Blind review does not mean that one must remove
116citations to one's own work---in fact it is often impossible to
117review a paper unless the previous citations are known and
118available.
119
120Blind review means that you do not use  words like  ``my'' or ``our''
121when citing previous work.  That is all.  (But see below for
122techreports)
123
124Saying ``this builds on the work of Lucy Smith [1]'' does not say
125that you are Lucy Smith, it says that you are building on her
126work.  If you are Smith and Jones, do not say ``as we show in
127[7]'', say ``as Smith and Jones show in [7]'' and at the end of the
128paper, include reference 7 as you would any other cited work.
129\textbf{Papers with improper self-references or that violate blind reviewing will be rejected.}
130
131An example of a \textbf{inappropriate} paper:
132\begin{quote}
133\begin{center}
134    An analysis of the frobnicatable foo filter.
135\end{center}
136
137   In this paper we present a performance analysis of our
138   previous paper [1], and show it to be inferior to all
139   previously known methods.  Why the previous paper was
140   accepted without this analysis is beyond me.
141
142   [1] Removed for blind review
143\end{quote}
144
145
146An example of an acceptable paper:
147
148\begin{quote}
149\begin{center}
150     An analysis of the frobnicatable foo filter.
151\end{center}
152
153   In this paper we present a performance analysis of the
154   paper of Smith \etal [1], and show it to be inferior to
155   all previously known methods.  Why the previous paper
156   was accepted without this analysis is beyond me.
157
158   [1] Smith, L and Jones, C. ``The frobnicatable foo
159   filter, a fundamental contribution to human knowledge''.
160   Nature 381(12), 1-213.
161\end{quote}
162
163
164
165Finally, you may feel you need to tell the reader that more details can be
166found elsewhere, and refer them to a technical report.  For conference
167submissions, the paper must stand on its own, and not {\em require} the
168reviewer to go to a techreport for further details.  Thus, you may say in
169the body of the paper ``further details may be found
170in~\cite{Authors11b}''. 
171Again, you may not assume the reviewers will read this material.
172
173Sometimes your paper is about a problem which you tested using a tool which
174is widely known to be restricted to a single institution.  For example,
175let's say it's 1969, you have solved a key problem on the Apollo lander,
176and you believe that the HPCA 12 audience would like to hear about your
177solution.  The work is a development of your celebrated 1968 paper entitled
178``Zero-g frobnication: How being the only people in the world with access to
179the Apollo lander source code makes us a wow at parties'', by Zeus \etal.
180
181You can handle this paper like any other.  Don't write ``We show how to
182improve our previous work [Anonymous, 1968].  This time we tested the
183algorithm on a lunar lander [name of lander removed for blind review]''.
184That would be silly, and would immediately identify the authors. Instead
185write the following:
186\begin{quotation}
187\noindent
188   We describe a system for zero-g frobnication.  This
189   system is new because it handles the following cases:
190   A, B.  Previous systems [Zeus et al. 1968] didn't
191   handle case B properly.  Ours handles it by including
192   a foo term in the bar integral.
193
194   ...
195
196   The proposed system was integrated with the Apollo
197   lunar lander, and went all the way to the moon, don't
198   you know.  It displayed the following behaviours
199   which show how well we solved cases A and B: ...
200\end{quotation}
201As you can see, the above text follows standard scientific convention,
202reads better than the first version, and does not explicitly name you as
203the authors.  A reviewer might think it likely that the new paper was
204written by Zeus \etal, but cannot make any decision based on that guess.
205He or she would have to be sure that no other authors could have been
206contracted to solve problem B.
207
208Do not include an acknowledgement  section in the submitted version.
209
210
211\begin{figure}[t]
212\begin{center}
213\fbox{\rule{0pt}{2in} \rule{0.9\linewidth}{0pt}}
214   %\includegraphics[width=0.8\linewidth]{egfigure.eps}
215\end{center}
216   \textsf{\caption{Example of caption.  }
217   \label{fig:long}
218   \label{fig:onecol}
219}
220
221\end{figure}
222
223\subsection{Miscellaneous}
224
225\noindent
226Compare the following:\\
227\begin{tabular}{ll}
228 \verb'$conf_a$' &  $conf_a$ \\
229 \verb'$\mathit{conf}_a$' & $\mathit{conf}_a$
230\end{tabular}\\
231See The \TeX book, p165.
232
233
234When citing a multi-author paper, you may save space by using ``et alia'',
235shortened to ``\etal'' (not ``{\em et.\ al.}'' as ``{\em et}'' is a complete word.)
236However, use it only when there are three or more authors.  Thus, the
237following is correct: ``
238   Frobnication has been trendy lately.
239   It was introduced by Alpher~\cite{Alpher02}, and subsequently developed by
240   Alpher and Fotheringham-Smythe~\cite{Alpher03}, and Alpher \etal~\cite{Alpher04}.''
241
242This is incorrect: ``... subsequently developed by Alpher \etal~\cite{Alpher03} ...''
243because reference~\cite{Alpher03} has just two authors.  If you use the
244\verb'\etal' macro provided, then you need not worry about double periods
245when used at the end of a sentence as in Alpher \etal.
246
247For this citation style, keep multiple citations in numerical (not
248chronological) order, so prefer~\cite{Alpher02,Alpher03,Authors11}  to~\cite{Alpher03,Alpher02,Authors11}.
249
250
251\begin{figure*}
252\begin{center}
253\fbox{\rule{0pt}{2in} \rule{.9\linewidth}{0pt}}
254\end{center}
255   \textsf{
256       \caption{Example of a short caption, which should be centered.} 
257       \label{fig:short}
258   }
259
260\end{figure*}
261
262%------------------------------------------------------------------------
263\section{Formatting your paper}
264
265The submission must be printed in PDF\ format and for letter-sized paper ($8.5 \times 11$-inch). All text must be in a single-column format. The total allowable width of the
266text area is $6\frac78$ inches (17.5 cm) wide by $8\frac78$ inches (22.54
267cm) high.  The main title (on the
268first page) should begin 1.0 inch (2.54 cm) from the top edge of the
269page. The second and following pages should begin 1.0 inch (2.54 cm) from
270the top edge. On all pages, the bottom margin should be 1-1/8 inches (2.86
271cm) from the bottom edge of the page for $8.5 \times 11$-inch paper;
272
273%-------------------------------------------------------------------------
274\subsection{Margins and page numbering}
275
276All printed material, including text, illustrations, and charts, must be
277kept within a print area 6-7/8 inches (17.5 cm) wide by 8-7/8 inches
278(22.54 cm) high.
279
280
281%-------------------------------------------------------------------------
282\subsection{Type-style and fonts}
283
284Wherever Times is specified, Times Roman may also be used. If neither is
285available on your word processor, please use the font closest in
286appearance to Times to which you have access.
287
288MAIN TITLE. Center the title 1-3/8 inches (3.49 cm) from the top edge of
289the first page. The title should be in Times 14-point, boldface type.
290Capitalize the first letter of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and
291adverbs; do not capitalize articles, coordinate conjunctions, or
292prepositions (unless the title begins with such a word). Leave two blank
293lines after the title.
294
295
296MAIN TEXT. Type main text in 12-point Times, double-spaced. All paragraphs should be indented 1 pica (approx. 1/6
297inch or 0.422 cm). Make sure your text is fully justified---that is,
298flush left and flush right. Please do not place any additional blank
299lines between paragraphs.
300
301Figure and table captions should be 10-point arial/sans serif (helvetica)\ type as in
302Figures~\ref{fig:onecol} and~\ref{fig:short}.  Short captions should be centred.
303
304\noindent Callouts should be 10-point Helvetica, non-boldface type.
305Initially capitalize only the first word of section titles and first-,
306second-, and third-order headings.
307
308Table contents should be in at least 10-point type.
309
310FIRST-ORDER HEADINGS. (For example, {\large \bf 1. Introduction})
311should be Times 14-point boldface, initially capitalized, flush left,
312with one blank line before, and one blank line after.
313
314SECOND-ORDER HEADINGS. (For example, { \bf 1.1. Database elements})
315should be Times 12-point boldface, initially capitalized, flush left,
316with one blank line before, and one after. If you require a third-order
317heading (we discourage it), use 12-point Times, boldface, initially
318capitalized, flush left, preceded by one blank line, followed by a period
319and your text on the same line.
320
321
322
323\subsection{Figure and Table References\\ }
324
325In order to get proper references to figure and table captions make sure to include the \textbackslash{label}\textbraceleft ...\textbraceright\ statement \textbf{with the} caption as follows:
326
327\verb'\begin{figure*}'\newline
328\verb'    ...'\newline
329\verb'    \textsf{'\newline
330\verb'       \caption{Caption text}'\newline 
331\verb'       \label{fig:short} <--- must be in here'\newline
332\verb'   }'\newline
333\verb'\end{figure*}'
334
335
336\subsection{Tables}
337
338Use at least 12-pt font size for your tables, center them, and use the same caption style as that for figures.
339
340%-------------------------------------------------------------------------
341\subsection{Footnotes}
342
343Please use footnotes\footnote {This is what a footnote looks like.  It
344often distracts the reader from the main flow of the argument.} sparingly.
345Indeed, try to avoid footnotes altogether and include necessary peripheral
346observations in
347the text (within parentheses, if you prefer, as in this sentence).  If you
348wish to use a footnote, place it at the bottom of the column on the page on
349which it is referenced. Use Times 10-point type, single-spaced or double-spaced.
350
351
352%-------------------------------------------------------------------------
353\subsection{References}
354
355List and number all bibliographical references in 10-point Times,
356single-spaced or double-spaced, at the end of your paper. When referenced in the text,
357enclose the citation number in square brackets, for
358example~\cite{Authors11}.  Where appropriate, include the name(s) of
359editors of referenced books.
360
361\begin{table}
362\begin{center}
363\begin{tabular}{|l|c|}
364\hline
365Method & Frobnability \\
366\hline\hline
367Theirs & Frumpy \\
368Yours & Frobbly \\
369Ours & All of the Above\\
370\hline
371\end{tabular}
372\end{center}
373\textsf{\caption{Results.   Ours is better.}\label{iamthetable}}
374\end{table}
375
376%-------------------------------------------------------------------------
377\subsection{Illustrations, graphs, and photographs}
378
379All graphics should be centered.  Please ensure that any point you wish to
380make is resolvable in a printed copy of the paper.  Resize fonts in figures
381to match the font in the body text, and choose line widths which render
382effectively in print.  Many readers (and reviewers), even of an electronic
383copy, will choose to print your paper in order to read it.  You cannot
384insist that they do otherwise, and therefore must not assume that they can
385zoom in to see tiny details on a graphic.
386Do not use font sizes less than 9pt in figures.
387
388When placing figures in \LaTeX, it's almost always best to use
389\verb+\includegraphics+, and to specify the  figure width as a multiple of
390the line width as in the example below
391{\small\begin{verbatim}
392   \usepackage[dvips]{graphicx} ...
393   \includegraphics[width=0.8\linewidth]
394                   {myfile.eps}
395\end{verbatim}
396}
397
398
399%-------------------------------------------------------------------------
400\subsection{Color}
401
402Color is valuable, and will be visible to readers of the electronic copy.
403However ensure that, when printed on a monochrome printer, no important
404information is lost by the conversion to grayscale.
405
406%------------------------------------------------------------------------
407
408
409{\small
410\bibliographystyle{ieee}
411\bibliography{egbib}
412}
413
414
415\end{document}
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