Changeset 2852


Ignore:
Timestamp:
Jan 27, 2013, 12:02:37 PM (6 years ago)
Author:
cameron
Message:

Rewrite into to GML2SVG study; fix typos.

Location:
docs/Working/icXML
Files:
2 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • docs/Working/icXML/conclusion.tex

    r2522 r2852  
    1313eliminate unneeded data prior to the \MP{} stage.
    1414Finally, the concepts used within \icXML{} and \icXMLp{} are not restricted to XML processing: \icXML{} should be considered a
    15 proof-of-concept work that shows it is possible to parallelize some finite-state machines by restructing the application
     15proof-of-concept work that shows it is possible to parallelize some finite-state machines by restructuring the application
    1616(and therefore the problem domain) to one that is more in line with current processor technology.
  • docs/Working/icXML/performance.tex

    r2528 r2852  
    6767Xerces is substantially slowed by dense markup
    6868but \icXML{} is relatively less affected as a result of the parallel processing technique.
    69 The pipelined \icXML{} performs even better on higher markup desity files
     69The pipelined \icXML{} performs even better on higher markup density files
    7070because the dense markup files are well balanced in this application.
    7171
     
    7878\subsection{GML2SVG}
    7979
    80 The visualization of geographic information is a primary goal of on-demand web-based mapping systems \cite{lu2007advances}.
    81 Web-based mapping systems commonly encode spatial data with GML for transmission and with SVG for display \cite{lu2007advances}.
    82 GML is an XML grammar defined by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) to encode geographical features \cite{lake2004geography}.
    83 As an XML grammar, GML is platform neutral and is well suited  the exchange of spatial data over the Internet.
    84 GML however, is not a visualization format. Rather, GML relies on commercially available viewers for data visualization,
    85 with Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) viewers being one of the most common \cite{lu2007advances}. Large volumes of GML data are
    86 typical in on-demand web-based mapping, and as a consequence, the visualization of GML as SVG requires
    87 high-performance GML to SVG translation.
    88 
    89 In this section we present a performance evaluation of the translation wide spectrum of Geography Markup Language (GML)
    90 data files to Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) format for visualization. In the GML to SVG benchmark, GML feature elements
     80As a more substantial application of XML processing, the GML-to-SVG (GML2SVG) application
     81was chosen.   This application transforms geospatially encoded data represented using
     82an XML representation in the form of Geography Markup Language (GML) \cite{lake2004geography}
     83into a different XML format  suitable for displayable maps:
     84Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) format\cite{lu2007advances}. In the GML2SVG benchmark, GML feature elements
    9185and GML geometry elements tags are matched. GML coordinate data are then extracted
    92 and transformed to the SVG path data encodings. Equivalent SVG path elements are generated and output to the destination
    93 SVG document. GML to SVG data translations are executed on GML source data modelling the city of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
     86and transformed to the corresponding SVG path data encodings.
     87Equivalent SVG path elements are generated and output to the destination
     88SVG document.  The GML2SVG application is thus considered typical of a broad
     89class of XML applications that parse and extract information from
     90a known XML format for the purpose of analysis and restructuring to meet
     91the requirements of an alternative format.
    9492
    9593\subsubsection{Workload}
    9694
    97 The GML source document set consists of 46 distinct GML feature layers ranging in size from approximately 9 KB to 125.2 MB
     95Our GML to SVG data translations are executed on GML source data
     96modelling the city of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
     97The GML source document set
     98consists of 46 distinct GML feature layers ranging in size from approximately 9 KB to 125.2 MB
    9899and with an average document size of 18.6 MB. Markup density ranges from approximately 0.0447 to 0.719
    99100and with an average markup density of 0.519. In this performance study,
Note: See TracChangeset for help on using the changeset viewer.